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UK drought: South West Water becomes the latest company to impose a hose ban


Another tornado ban was announced today, with Cornwall and parts of Devon becoming the next area of ​​Britain to face temporary restrictions as South West Water introduces a policy of just over time. a week.

Four water companies – Manx Water, Welsh Water, Southern Water and South East Water – have all imposed a ban on the use of water cannons, while Yorkshire Water announced the restrictions would start on August 26.

Thames Water is also planning a ban in the coming weeks, after a drought was declared for parts of England after the driest summer in 50 years that has almost completely cut off rainfall in some areas. area during the summer.

Now, South West Water has announced that it will impose its own ‘temporary use ban’ restrictions from midnight on August 23, with bosses saying it will be its first ban. company for a quarter of a century.

Low water levels at Lake Colliford near Bodmin, pictured last Friday.  The water level at Cornwall's largest reservoir is now just 40 per cent full - the lowest water level not seen since 1995 - revealing a forgotten landscape not seen in decades

Low water levels at Lake Colliford near Bodmin, pictured last Friday.  The water level at Cornwall's largest reservoir is now just 40 per cent full - the lowest water level not seen since 1995 - revealing a forgotten landscape not seen in decades

Low water levels at Lake Colliford near Bodmin, pictured last Friday. The water level at Cornwall’s largest reservoir is now just 40 per cent full – the lowest water level not seen since 1995 – revealing a forgotten landscape not seen in decades

Low water levels and dry substrate at Lake Colliford near Bodmin in Cornwall last Friday.  After a prolonged period of drought, parts of England are in a dry state, leading to a ban on the use of water cannons and other water conservation measures.

Low water levels and dry substrate at Lake Colliford near Bodmin in Cornwall last Friday.  After a prolonged period of drought, parts of England are in a dry state, leading to a ban on the use of water cannons and other water conservation measures.

Low water levels and dry soil at Lake Colliford near Bodmin in Cornwall last Friday. After a prolonged period of drought, parts of England are in a dry state, leading to a ban on the use of water cannons and other water conservation measures.

A South West Water spokesman said today: ‘This is the first time in 26 years but we have no other choice. We need a hose ban now to protect our precious water. ‘

‘We did our best to avoid this ban. We have increased the amount of water we can store, doubling since the last drought in 1976.

‘We’ve opened reservoirs, installed a new borehole and improved the way we can move water throughout the area to help keep people’s faucets running.’

South West Water says it is currently repairing about 2,000 leaks a month, with a third occurring on a customer’s supply pipeline, which is being repaired at no charge.

Last Friday, very dry conditions prompted the National Drought Group to move parts of the South West, parts of southern and central England, and eastern England into official drought status.

Data collected from more than 18 water utilities, including Thames Water, Severn Trent Water, United Utilities and Welsh Water, shows that locations from Oxfordshire and London, to Warwickshire, have no water or poor pressure.

Data collected from more than 18 water utilities, including Thames Water, Severn Trent Water, United Utilities and Welsh Water, shows that locations from Oxfordshire and London, to Warwickshire, have no water or poor pressure.

Data collected from more than 18 water utilities, including Thames Water, Severn Trent Water, United Utilities and Welsh Water, shows that locations from Oxfordshire and London, to Warwickshire, have no water or poor pressure.

The change could lead to more measures such as a ban on hoses, but the Environment Agency has reassured the public that essential water supplies are safe.

The most recent data from the Environment Agency shows total rainfall in August ranges from 12% of the long-term average in north-east England to 0% in south-east and south-west England.

Meanwhile, river flow data shows that nearly 90% of measured locations show below normal readings, with 29% labeled ‘extraordinarily low’. Hot and dry conditions also affect agriculture.

According to the National Farmers Union, crops such as sugar beet and corn are showing signs of stress due to lack of rain, while irrigation-dependent crops such as vegetables and potatoes are also facing problems.



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