Health

More than 2.5 million US students reported using a tobacco product in 2021


More than 2.5 million students in the US used tobacco products by 2021, according to a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In total, the CDC reports that 13 percent of high school students and four percent of middle school students used tobacco products last year, and more than a third of high school students used a tobacco product. smoking at some point in life.

More than 80% of usage is attributed to disposable e-cigarettes and pods or canister products – which have become a dangerous trend among young Americans.

While teen smoking isn’t nearly as common as it was decades ago, a recent resurgence has prompted health officials and parents to worry about the family risk. increased cancer and other negative effects of tobacco use.

The CDC reports that more than 2.5 million students in the US were using 'current' tobacco products by 2021. This includes 13% of high school students and 4% of middle school students. department

The CDC reports that more than 2.5 million students in the US were using 'current' tobacco products by 2021. This includes 13% of high school students and 4% of middle school students. department

The CDC reports that more than 2.5 million students in the US were using ‘current’ tobacco products by 2021. This includes 13% of high school students and 4% of middle school students. department

Disposable e-cigarettes and refillable cartridges account for more than 80% of youth tobacco product use in the US

Disposable e-cigarettes and refillable cartridges account for more than 80% of youth tobacco product use in the US

Disposable e-cigarettes and refillable cartridges account for more than 80% of youth tobacco product use in the US

‘Parents, educators, youth advocates and healthcare providers can help protect adolescents from the harmful effects of tobacco products, including tobacco products, the researchers write. even e-cigarettes.

‘In addition, the comprehensive and sustainable implementation of evidence-based tobacco control strategies, combined with FDA regulation of tobacco products, is critical to reducing all forms of tobacco use. tobacco product use among youth in the United States.’

The CDC, which announced its findings online Thursday, collected data from high school and middle school students around the country through the National Youth Tobacco Survey.

A child who has used a tobacco product within the past 30 days is identified as a ‘current’ user.

Around 2.06 million high school students – 13% of the study population – and 4% of middle school students – 470,000 participants – reported ‘current’ tobacco use.

By comparison, in 2020, the CDC reports that eight percent of high school students and three percent of middle school students are current tobacco users.

Students were also asked if they had ever used tobacco products in their life, with 34% of high school students and 11% of middle school students reporting at least one use.

Those who identified as lesbian, gay or bisexual were more likely to use tobacco products, with 14% reporting use, compared with just 8% of heterosexual students.

Devices like the JUUL are largely blamed for the recent rise in tobacco use among adolescents due to their fruity taste and how easy it is to carry and use them without getting hit. detect (file image)

Devices like JUULs have been largely blamed for the recent surge in tobacco use among adolescents due to their fruity flavors and how easy they are to carry and use undetected (file image)

Devices like the JUUL are largely blamed for the recent rise in tobacco use among adolescents due to their fruity taste and how easy it is to carry and use them without getting hit. detect (file image)

According to CDC research, vaping devices are responsible for the increase in nicotine intake and tobacco use over the past year.

Among students who reported being current smokers, 54% used disposable e-cigarettes and 29% reported using some type of refillable device – similar to the JUUL.

Between them, devices that allow teens to use nicotine with ease and clarity make up more than 80 percent of all students who use tobacco.

However, some disagree that devices that do not deliver tobacco, like cigarettes, but only contain nicotine, should be included in this data.

Mark Oates, director of We Vape, told DailyMail.com in a statement: “It is alarming that the CDC combines smoking with safer nicotine products like e-cigarettes.

‘The results from this study are actively misleading. E-cigarettes do not contain tobacco and they are described as a tobacco product. ‘

‘…By hitting on safer nicotine products like vaping, we will inadvertently encourage high school students to smoke instead, which would be a dire outcome.’

We Vape, an advocacy group, believes that e-cigarette products should not be included in research because they deliver nicotine, not tobacco.

We Vape, an advocacy group, believes that e-cigarette products should not be included in research because they deliver nicotine, not tobacco.

We Vape, an advocacy group, believes that e-cigarette products should not be included in research because they deliver nicotine, not tobacco.

Oates also mentions that some doctors in the UK prescribe the device to smokers to help them quit.

Nicotine doesn’t offer as many negative effects and cancer risks as smoking, but increases the risk of high blood pressure, narrowing of the arteries, and increased heart rate.

The use of e-cigarettes among school-age children can be attributed to their taste and the devices are similar to a USB stick, allowing children to easily bring them to school without being caught.

Some states and cities have banned the sale of flavored nicotine products, though results have varied as to whether they have successfully stopped the habit among teenagers.

It is illegal to buy nicotine and tobacco products, as the national age to buy nicotine was recently moved to 21.

Students often consider cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products to be the most harmful, according to research

Students often consider cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products to be the most harmful, according to research

Students often consider cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products to be the most harmful, according to research

About one-third of students who have used medication said they purchased the medication from a friend, a third reported receiving the medication for themselves by some means, and just under 30 percent had someone else buy it for them. surname.

Exposure to advertising for products containing nicotine and tobacco is also rampant.

Just over three out of four students were considered to have been exposed to tobacco or tobacco advertising, and more than 70% of students using social networks were exposed to ads.

Students said they started using tobacco products because they were introduced to them by a friend, were curious about them, or reported feeling stressed, anxious or depressed.

Cigarettes and smokeless tobacco are considered by students to be the most dangerous products, consistent with the opinion of many medical professionals.

Source: | This article originally belonged to Dailymail.co.uk



Source link

news7f

News7F: Update the world's latest breaking news online of the day, breaking news, politics, society today, international mainstream news .Updated news 24/7: Entertainment, Sports...at the World everyday world. Hot news, images, video clips that are updated quickly and reliably

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button