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HBCUs are back in the spotlight for Black students and their families : NPR


Morehouse College is one of a number of black colleges and universities that have historically seen an increase in applications and enrollment in recent years.

Mike Stewart / AP


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Mike Stewart / AP


Morehouse College is one of a number of black colleges and universities that have historically seen an increase in applications and enrollment in recent years.

Mike Stewart / AP

Several historically black colleges and universities is seeing an increase in black students applying and enrolling after years of decline.

The National Center for Education Statistics reported that those enrolling in the school fell from 18% in 1976 to 8% in 2014. But by 2020, that number has grown to 9%. HBCUs like Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, have seen an increase in applications. At that school, the number has increased by more than 60% in 2020 from last year, according to Data USA.

There are several factors behind the change – including a push from eminent graduates As Vice President Harris – but some Black students and their families find a safer learning environment with these facilities.

Sherille McKethan-Green, whose son Gideon Green is studying at Morehouse, considers herself one of them.

“I feel that after he graduates from college he will have time to be in the minority, but at Morehouse he will be the majority,” she told NPR.

The first HBCU is founded in the 1830sbefore the Civil War, give black Americans the opportunity to pursue higher education.

Walter Kimbrough, interim executive director of the Institute for Black Men Studies at Morehouse University, told NPR that these schools are crucial to the development of a black professional team.

“Your teachers, your doctors, your lawyers, your ministers – they come out of that HBCU tradition,” he said.

However, these schools are not immune to the forces As financial challenges and the question of whether affirmative action policies should exist.

According to an analysis of Latino Institute of Politics and Policy at the University of California, Los Angeles, on the impact of COVID on enrollment of students of color.

But then a movement for racial justice gained national attention.

Paulina Webber, an incoming senior at Dillard University, told NPR that she sees more students choosing HBCU.

“We saw the pinnacle of the Black Lives Matter movement, and then we saw students say, ‘Hey, I want to go to a Black school. I want to be safe. I want to enjoy my time,” she said.

Webber added that the experiences shared as Black at HBCUs help students understand and navigate the world when they graduate.

For McKethan-Green, her son’s attendance at Morehouse was the culmination of a years-long dream.

“I have got it [him] a sweater that reads ‘Future Morehouse College graduate’ at age 3,” she said.

He chose to apply only to HBCUs, and when he was admitted to Morehouse, she was overjoyed.

“He needs to be around the people … that he cares about most in his heart and will also tell him ‘You’re going to be great. You’re going to be successful.'”



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