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Haaland will tour America as part of ‘The Road to Healing’ : NPR


Interior Secretary Deb Haaland will speak to Native American boarding school survivors as part of a tour titled “The Road to Healing.” Her department found that between 1819 and 1969, the federal government operated or supported more than 400 schools.

Image by Samuel Corum / Getty


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Image by Samuel Corum / Getty


Interior Secretary Deb Haaland will speak to Native American boarding school survivors as part of a tour titled “The Road to Healing.” Her department found that between 1819 and 1969, the federal government operated or supported more than 400 schools.

Image by Samuel Corum / Getty

The Department of the Interior finds that the United States operates or actively supports more than 400 American Indian boarding schools from 1819 to 1969 – a history of influencing the agency’s own leadership.

Secretary Deb Haaland, First Native American to serve as cabinet secretarytell NPR’s All things Considered that she had grandparents who were removed from their homes and placed in these schools.

“[Those are] Terrible years in a child’s life, she said. It’s important for our country to recognize and understand this history because I think it’s important for every American to know what happened. “

The detection of parts comes after an investigation into these schools and the federal government’s role in maintaining them.

Just like in CanadaIndigenous children attending these schools were forcibly removed from their families to be “assimilated”, as it was described at the time.

Many children have reported brutal conditions. Others never returned home.

U.S. officials identified at least 53 schools with marked or unmarked burial sites containing the remains of children who died there.

In an effort to confront this history, Haaland says she plans to meet with boarding school survivors around the country in the coming weeks. a tour called “The Road to Healing.”

“I always like to visit with people in Country India. We are all relatives,” she said. “Above all, I just had to hear those stories myself.”

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

As to why this is the first US government document on the popularity of boarding schools in India:

Maybe part of it stems from the fact that we don’t have many Native American leaders in our country. Representative problem. And that’s one of the reasons why I feel it’s important for me to raise this issue.

On the long-term impact of these boarding schools on Indigenous communities:

There are current impacts on drug addiction and poverty, economic underdevelopment and health disparities. When everyone is invisible, you don’t have to pay attention. We should care about every single community in this country. So bring all this to light; it will make us a better country.

On the idea that recounting traumatic history is divisive:

These are real people, and this is their life. I think it’s important that we heal as a nation. The experience of everyone in the boarding school system, whether they are survivors or descendants, that pain is real. And it’s my responsibility to make sure I’m paying attention to that and I’m doing all I can to make sure that we can heal and get people through that pain.



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