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Giant penis carved in rock face discovered deep in the Australian outback


A giant carved penis discovered at an Aboriginal rock art site is not vandalism but part of an Ancient Dream story.

The work is estimated to be from 5,000 years old to less than 100 years old.

Archaeologists from Griffith University and Traditional Owners Iningai worked together to catalog the works of art inside a 160m-long stone shelter known as Marra Wonga located near Barcaldine, about 110 kilometers east of Longreach in the Queensland outback.

The shelter is filled with over 15,000 rock carvings, with a large portion of the artwork focused on telling the story of the ‘Seven Sisters’ from start to finish.

A large engraving of a penis follows boomerangs in an Indigenous rock art site near Barcaldine, Central Queensland, which is part of the 5,000-year-old Dreaming teaching site (pictured is the penis, represents Wattanuri, chasing the sisters in the story of the Seven Sisters)

A large engraving of a penis follows boomerangs in an Indigenous rock art site near Barcaldine, Central Queensland, which is part of the 5,000-year-old Dreaming teaching site (pictured is the penis, represents Wattanuri, chasing the sisters in the story of the Seven Sisters)

A large engraving of a penis follows boomerangs in an Indigenous rock art site near Barcaldine, Central Queensland, which is part of the 5,000-year-old Dreaming teaching site (pictured is the penis, represents Wattanuri, chasing the sisters in the story of the Seven Sisters)

The site is believed to have been used as a teaching space (pictured, indigenous researcher Suzanne Thompson in front of a depiction of the Rainbow Snake)

The site is believed to have been used as a teaching space (pictured, indigenous researcher Suzanne Thompson in front of a depiction of the Rainbow Snake)

The site is believed to have been used as a teaching space (pictured, indigenous researcher Suzanne Thompson in front of a depiction of the Rainbow Snake)

The story is told around the world and often involves the Pleiades star cluster.

The phallic carving is part of the story of the Seven Sisters, representing Wattanuri.

Professor Paul Tacon of Griffith University told the Sydney Morning Herald: “In the story, two sisters are pursued by a powerful ancestor known as Wattanuri, who is often associated with the constellation Orion.

Other inscriptions, such as the six-toed foot, show that the site was used to tell Dream stories (pictured, feet with varying numbers of toes, up to 11)

Other inscriptions, such as the six-toed foot, show that the site was used to tell Dream stories (pictured, feet with varying numbers of toes, up to 11)

Other inscriptions, such as the six-toed foot, show that the site was used to tell Dream stories (pictured, feet with varying numbers of toes, up to 11)

‘At one stage he went under the ground and emerged like a giant penis and threw a boomerang at the sisters, which we see illustrated quite clearly in that panel.’

Mr. Talcon said Marra Wonga, which means ‘place of many stories’, is an extremely unique venue and can be used as a teaching space.

“There is no other site in Australia with art like this telling the story from one end of the shelter to the other,” Professor Tacon said.

This site is the first in Australia to tell a story from start to finish (pictured, the star designs represent the Seven Sisters)

This site is the first in Australia to tell a story from start to finish (pictured, the star designs represent the Seven Sisters)

This site is the first in Australia to tell a story from start to finish (pictured, the star designs represent the Seven Sisters)

Other artwork inside the cave, such as the six-toed feet, shows the cave being used to tell dream stories.

Some of the carvings inside the cave are believed to be about 5,000 years old.

CEO Suzanne Thompson of Yambangku Aboriginal Cultural Heritage and Tourism Development Corporation initially called for the site to be profiled in 2019, but the Covid pandemic prevented archaeologists from visiting the site. this point.

The stone shelter is located at Turraburra station, about 130 kilometers north of Barcaldine, and is managed by the Yambangku Aboriginal Cultural Heritage and Tourism Development Corporation.

The unique site is located at Turraburra station, about 130 kilometers north of Barcaldine in Central Queensland (pictured, outline of two boomerangs)

The unique site is located at Turraburra station, about 130 kilometers north of Barcaldine in Central Queensland (pictured, outline of two boomerangs)

The unique site is located at Turraburra station, about 130 kilometers north of Barcaldine in Central Queensland (pictured, outline of two boomerangs)

THE SEVEN HISTORY

The story The Starry Dream of the Seven Sisters is one of the most widely circulated ancient stories among Aboriginal Australians. The song for this story covers more than half the width of the continent, from deep in the Central Desert to the west coast. The song line goes through many different language groups and different parts of the story are recorded in different parts of the country.

In the story of the Seven Sisters of Aboriginal Australia, the group of stars are the Napaljarri sisters of a skin group. In this Jukurrpa Warlpiri story, two sisters are often shown carrying the man Jampijinpa Wardilyka, who is in love with women. Then the morning star, Jukurra-jukurra, a Jakamarra man and lover of the seven Napaljarri sisters, is shown chasing them across the night sky. They were said to be on the run, running away from the man who wanted to take one of the sisters as his wife. However, according to traditional law, men who pursue sisters are the wrong skin group and are prohibited from marrying a Napaljarri wife.

So the Seven Sisters were on the run from the Jampijinpa man, they crossed the land, and then from a steep hill they launched themselves into the sky to try to escape. But the man Jakamarra followed the sisters into the sky, traveling as a star seen in the cluster of Orion’s Rings, also considered the base of the constellation Big Dipper. So every night the Seven Sisters launched themselves from the earth into the night sky, and every night the man Jampijinpa followed them in the sky.

Source: Japingka Aboriginal Art




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