Health

Care worker fired for denying Covid jab permission to argue religious grounds, judge rules


A care worker who was fired because she refused to get a coronavirus vaccine could argue in an upcoming trial that her reasons were religion, a labor judge has ruled.

Patrycja Wierowska worked as a carer for HC-One care homes until she was laid off on April 28, 2021.

Ms. Wierowska, a lifelong Roman Catholic, claimed that one of the reasons she was fired was because she refused to get the Covid vaccine for religious reasons.

In a preliminary ruling released on Friday, employment judge Eoin Fowell ruled that Ms Wierowska could rely on her religion as a protected trait in an employment court.

He wrote: ‘I am pleased that her views on vaccines are closely linked to her religious beliefs, and that there is a sufficiently close and direct link between her word refusing to take the Covid vaccine and her fundamental beliefs.’

The ruling follows a preliminary hearing on the matter held remotely at Exeter Employment Court in July.

Patrycja Wierowska, a lifelong Roman Catholic, claims that one of the reasons she was fired from HC-One was because she refused to get a Covid vaccine for religious reasons (Image: One woman received Covid vaccine)

Patrycja Wierowska, a lifelong Roman Catholic, claims that one of the reasons she was fired from HC-One was because she refused to get a Covid vaccine for religious reasons (Image: One woman received Covid vaccine)

Patrycja Wierowska, a lifelong Roman Catholic, claims that one of the reasons she was fired from HC-One was because she refused to get a Covid vaccine for religious reasons (Image: One woman received Covid vaccine)

Ms Wierowska believes using the vaccine would go against her beliefs as it involves the use of ‘fetal blood’.

The claimant said this was based on the Roman Catholic command that blood and life are both God-given and sacrosanct, so changing the blood using a human vaccine creating or using an aborted fetus for testing is against the principles of her faith. Covid vaccine.

It comes after a debate erupted in the global Catholic community about vaccines using cell lines derived from tissues from abortions performed decades ago.

In December 2020, the Vatican told Roman Catholics it was ethically acceptable to use the Covid-19 vaccine even if their production used cell lines taken from tissues. of the aborted fetus.

Giving evidence at a hearing in July, Ms. Wierowska said she accepted the Vatican’s position but that she also had ‘free will’.

She also accepts the ethics lawsuit for stopping the spread of the infection to protect care home residents, but says she is doing everything else to prevent transmission.

Ms Wierowska said she was skeptical of the value of masks “given the size of particles in the air” and admitted she did not wear one while attending Freedom Day in London on 20 March 2021. , ‘where about a million people are present’.

In December 2020, the Vatican told Roman Catholics that the use of the Covid-19 vaccine was ethically acceptable even if their production used cell lines taken from their own tissues. Aborted fetus (Image: Pope Francis)

In December 2020, the Vatican told Roman Catholics that the use of the Covid-19 vaccine was ethically acceptable even if their production used cell lines taken from their own tissues. Aborted fetus (Image: Pope Francis)

In December 2020, the Vatican told Roman Catholics that the use of the Covid-19 vaccine was ethically acceptable even if their production used cell lines taken from their own tissues. Aborted fetus (Image: Pope Francis)

Wierowska was also concerned that Covid vaccines could interfere with the DNA in the nucleus of cells and that they were being tested with unknown long-term effects, the hearing was told.

Stuart Irving, representing HC-One Oval Limited, argues that the vaccine proponent’s position is not so much a religious belief as a philosophical one and that she is simply not convinced. supported by current scientific evidence.

But Dr. Anna Loutfi, a consultant representing Ms. Wierowska, said her views were deeply rooted in her religious and worldview.

She added her views need not be orthodox or orthodox views of the Catholic Church and that a religious belief can be defended even if it is not mandated by religion.

In his ruling, Mr. Fowell dismissed suggestions that the plaintiff’s concerns were fundamentally health-based.

He wrote: ‘This is an issue that has plagued the Catholic community worldwide, to the point where a definitive statement has been made by the Vatican on behalf of the Pope in an attempt to resolve the issue.

‘Even that statement does not go to the point of criticizing any Catholic who refuses to be vaccinated for moral reasons, and this is implicit in the statement that this remains a matter of personal conscience. .

‘Those ethical concerns are closely related to the longstanding Catholic position on abortion and lead to opposition to the use of stem cells or fetal material in medical experiments under any circumstances. any form.’

WHAT THE RULES SAY: JUDGE FARRELL COMMENTS

‘In Ms Wierowska’s account, she explains that she is brought to Mass every week, on Holy Days, and that she is committed to nurturing her religion

‘For her, there is no question of the absolute truth of a creator or the presence of sin in the world. She prays daily to the Virgin Mary and describes her “earthly struggle” to negotiate the temporary demands of “those in power in government and culture who seek to deny the Holy Spirit of God.” we.”

‘One of the tenets of her faith is that life is sacred, so, for example, “taking the life of the most innocent, in the womb is a mortal sin”.

‘Her interest in the practice of abortion extends to the use of aborted fetuses in scientific treatments. She said that once she heard that the mRNA vaccine contained such fetal material, alarm bells rang for her. For many people this is not a concern, she explained, but for her any interference with genetics and traceable bloodlines goes against the will of God.

‘She considered blood a sacred ingredient, and quoted in her statement from a biblical passage, Saint Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians, 6:19, that one’s body is the temple of the Holy Spirit.

‘It seems from the document in the package that she is not alone in these views and that there has been a debate in Catholic circles about the ethics of vaccination. According to the BBC article on page 55, in light of these concerns, the Vatican issued a statement that such a vaccine is “morally acceptable”.

‘Miss Wierowska was asked at length about the basis of her concern about vaccines. She accepts the Vatican’s view that vaccination is acceptable but she points to the fact that she has free will, is God-given and no one can change her mind that’s hers.

‘She also accepts the moral case for stopping the spread of infections to protect the vulnerable, such as residents of care homes, but she says she is doing it. everything else to prevent transmission.

‘I am pleased that her views on vaccines are closely linked to her religious faith, and that there is a sufficiently close and direct link between her refusal to take the vaccine. beg and her basic beliefs. Therefore, she has the right to rely on that religious faith as a protected identity. ‘




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